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Is there such a thing as post tramatic syndrome after breast cancer treatment? If there is I got broadsided with it today.Wasn"t prepared for it!!

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anonymous

Survivor since 2012 over 7 years
 
  • Rita Jo Hayes Profile
    anonymes
    Survivant depuis 2009
    Jo this is just an FYI, but when I was going thru chemo the hot flashes were so severe. Ask doc for some help. He put me on 40mg of citalopram daily to help with the flashes. It did help a lot. About 3 months down the road when the nurses were reviewing my meds they mentioned the antidepressant? I said what I' m not taking anything for depression. Come to find out the citalopram "was" the antidepressant, only I was taking it for other reasons. In the long run it not only helped with the flashes, it probably helped my "disposition! I then went on femra for 14 months, again the citalopram came to my rescue. Might b something u could check out. Good luck and advancing on ur novel.
    over 7 years Flag
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      anonymes
      Survivant depuis 2012

      Thanx. Not gonna go it alone anymore. Mother's little pill is on the table now.

      over 7 years Flag
  • Sharon Danielson Profile
    anonymes
    Survivant depuis 2007
    I completely agree... it is the most traumatic event most of us have ever faced. One day you are sailing along and next you are hit with a diagnosis of breast cancer and mentally facing your own mortality. It is sobering, and a pretty tough journey. I am on an anti-depressant or I would be sitting in the corner drooling and talking to myself. I feel... "normal" and can think rationally. I think we all have up and down days. I find much support with everyone on this site because we are pretty much in the same boat. Here we can find total understanding and acceptance. If you haven't been where we have, it is difficult to have any idea of what your body and mind goes through. We are all on this battlefield together, my sisters. Love and understanding to all. Sharon
    over 7 years Flag
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      anonymous
      Survivor since 2012

      Thanx Sharon. Gonna get a happy pill and move forward.

      over 7 years Flag
    • Rita Jo Hayes Profile
      anonymes
      Survivant depuis 2009

      Sharon: this is not bc related, but I can not insert anything in my profile like you all have, like a pic or profile history. I can't even post a question on the main page like everyone else. What am I doing wrong? Thanks

      over 7 years Flag
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymes
      Survivant depuis 2007

      Rita Jo, if you look on the upper right of this page, you will see "MY HOME" click on that and scroll down to "ACCOUNT INFORMATION" that will be where you can write your story, your photo you want to download, and any other information you want...

      plus

      Rita Jo, if you look on the upper right of this page, you will see "MY HOME" click on that and scroll down to "ACCOUNT INFORMATION" that will be where you can write your story, your photo you want to download, and any other information you want made public. Let me me know if you have further trouble and I can walk you through it.
      Take care, Sharon

      over 7 years Flag
  • Thumb avatar default
    anonymes
    Survivant depuis 2012
    Wow!! You girls know how to pump up a fellow sister. My treatment has been a kindergarten fieldtrip compared to most of you. I was blessed in missing the chemo, only had a partial mastectomy with 3 sentinel node biopsy, 16 rads and Femara. I can't believe the way I just referred to cancer. A year ago I would have dug a hole and jumped in if you had told me my body would suffer that. My husband and I were only retired for one year, enjoying a revitalized marriage after 42 years, just completed my first draft of my first novel, and about to take a frivilous vacation to anywhere. I'm meloncholy by nature and I highly suspect my new friend, Femara, may be in colusion with my nature. Oh well. I love you girls. I feel like I have the best of friends that can stand my whine in a pinch. Thank God for this site and the Steel Magnolias that offer love, wisdom, and cyber support. Hugs to all of you with my cyber arms. Jo ;-)
    over 7 years Flag
    • Anne Marie jacintho Profile
      anonymes
      Survivant depuis 2003

      On another note. I'm curios about your novel. Would live to hear all about it. annmo1960@gmail.com

      over 7 years Flag
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      anonymous
      Survivor since 2012

      Will do.

      over 7 years Flag
    • Therese McKenna Profile
      anonymes
      Patient

      Love this post and feel like you all carry me through! Go to my surgeon tomorrow to lay out plan and schedule surgery! Blessings! Thank you all for sharing!

      almost 5 years Flag
    • Amie B. Profile
      anonymes
      stage_2a Patient

      Wow Therese... I am in the process of making sure my mind is in that same space and your comment just helped me press on that way!!!!! Many thanks and blessings/good vibes to all!!!! xo

      almost 4 years Flag
  • Thumb avatar default
    anonymes
    Étude du cancer du sein
    Hi I've been down lately myself. People keep telling me how strong I am. I appreciate it but sometimes I don't feel so strong and I hide it. I've been teary eyed for about 3 weeks. Anthi
    over 7 years Flag
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      anonymes
      Étude du cancer du sein

      Anything seems to set me off. This is not the usual me. I still have radiation therapy to tackle and I know I can do it but some how some inside me is sad. I know breast cancer is what it is and I have go through each treatment to be well again....

      plus

      Anything seems to set me off. This is not the usual me. I still have radiation therapy to tackle and I know I can do it but some how some inside me is sad. I know breast cancer is what it is and I have go through each treatment to be well again. If only we could turn off our thoughts and fears for awhile. Life is a test and we've all had or are having one of the biggest. Bless you all jayme

      over 7 years Flag
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      anonymes
      Survivant depuis 2012

      I feel you. That's why I posted yesterday. I'm better today, but my kids are in from Houston so the days will be full. No time to mull. People seem to be one of my answers to getting past the Cancer cloud. Sending hugs hoping your day will be...

      plus

      I feel you. That's why I posted yesterday. I'm better today, but my kids are in from Houston so the days will be full. No time to mull. People seem to be one of my answers to getting past the Cancer cloud. Sending hugs hoping your day will be better.

      over 7 years Flag
    • Elaine Mills Profile
      anonymes
      Stage 2B Patient

      Jayme, I go through the same thing. People are always telling me how strong I am and how proud of me they are. I appreciate it, too, but behind closed doors I am breaking down several times a week. Hormones? Being overwhelmed? I am tired of...

      plus

      Jayme, I go through the same thing. People are always telling me how strong I am and how proud of me they are. I appreciate it, too, but behind closed doors I am breaking down several times a week. Hormones? Being overwhelmed? I am tired of this whole process. I find that I keep myself busy serving others as much as I can just to keep my mind distracted off of my emotional pain. If ya ever need a sounding board, join "We Are Sisters" on facebook. It is for survivors only and it has helped me through on my bad days so much.

      over 7 years Flag
  • Anne Marie jacintho Profile
    anonymes
    Survivant depuis 2003
    Morning Jo. I think with anything traumatic in your life it is possible to have a bout with post traumatic stress syndrome And dealing with breast cancer is very traumatic we stay strong we stay positive we keep on moving but yet some days it all seems so overwhelming. What we have been through and it just never seems to end. Those small mighty pills throw us for a loop. Your journey has been an intense journey I cannot even imagine how it was. Mine was a piece of cake kind of took the easy way out with the multiple mastectomies. So you are definitely entitled to days of being overwhelmed I certainly have those days have myself a little cry then tell myself it's not that bad start to count my blessings and try my best to get through the day. I'll call a friend we'll commiserate together and laugh. You are not alone. Sending you a big big gentle bear hug.
    over 7 years Flag
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymes
      Survivant depuis 2012

      Thanks. I took my 10 year-old granddaughter to her favorite store-Wal-Mart. After we found her favorite lip gloss she looked up at me and asked, "Do you feel better now Grandma?" I told her I always feel better when I shop with my favorite girl.

      over 7 years Flag
    • Anne Marie jacintho Profile
      anonymes
      Survivant depuis 2003

      Jo you just brought tears to my eyes your precious little gift from god children/grandchildren carrying us through the day. My daughter was 3 and my son 5 when I was first diagnosed many a day they picked me up from the blues. Hugs to you both

      over 7 years Flag
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymes
      Survivant depuis 2012

      They are special gifts . :-D

      over 7 years Flag
    • Anne Marie jacintho Profile
      anonymes
      Survivant depuis 2003

      Jo I was here putting water for our cows and thought about how I felt a year after my treatment frustrated angry here is a link to my story towards the end I have my reflection after a year http://home.roadrunner.com/~amj/

      over 7 years Flag
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      anonymous
      Survivor since 2012

      Thanks for the link.

      over 7 years Flag
  • Marianne R. Profile
    anonymes
    Survivant depuis 2011
    Yes and there is treatment for it. Please don't suffer another moment.
    over 7 years Flag
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymes
      Survivant depuis 2012

      Thanx, Calling the doc.

      over 7 years Flag
    • Marianne R. Profile
      anonymes
      Survivant depuis 2011

      Do it . I just wanted the nightmares to go away.

      over 7 years Flag
  • Erin Timlin Profile
    anonymes
    Survivant depuis 2011
    Oh yes! So many people who helped treat me said that many women deal with the treatment in a strong and positive way, handling every blow and just moving along. However, once treatment is done, many women feel more helpless. All of a sudden we have no more control and no medicine or treatment keeping the cancer away. You move into the phase where you might start to worry if it'll come back. I am done with 28 radiation treatments tomorrow and while I am SO happy, I wonder if these feelings will affect me. (Although, I ham having herceptin until mid winter or so which might keep me moving along without the abrupt stop). It is a real thing and I am sure support groups and our support people at the hospital can help manage the feelings. Keep up the positive thoughts!
    over 7 years Flag
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      anonymes
      Survivant depuis 2012

      Thanx, Erin. I definitely felt like i'm free-falling, but I'm calling the doc.

      over 7 years Flag
  • Evelyn Heilbrunn Profile
    anonymes
    Survivant depuis 2012
    Hi, Jo. So sorry to hear you're down in the dumps. It has happened to me both times I've had breast cancer. For me, I think it's because I had some measure of control during treatment. I attended my chemo and radiation sessions, I ate right, I did everything they told me to do. But then you hit the "sit and wait" period which was very upsetting for me. Medicine has done all it can do, I gave it 110%, and now I don't have much control over it. It will pass, as time goes on and you gain confidence in your health status. Try to take it easy and go with it. If necessary, talk to a counselor if you think you're getting into a real depression. Even so, talking to an objective listener can often help. Good Luck!
    over 7 years Flag
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2012

      Thanx! Advice noted> :-D

      over 7 years Flag
  • Rita Jo Hayes Profile
    anonymes
    Survivant depuis 2009
    Agreed After 18 strong treatments of two kinds of chemo and herceptin, " up front chemo" , as they called it, double masectomy, then 9 treatments of herceptin follow up, my treatment stopped abruptly 2 treatments short due to cardio myopathy. I asked to have the last two treatments as I was afraid if we didn't finish full cycle I was "doomed" . But doc wouldn't do it. So there I was going from full weekly sced of chemo to on a 3 month follow check up cycle and felt lost. Hang in there. You will have a void where you used to live your schedule around the treatment but you will eventually find a new " nom". Good luck.
    over 7 years Flag
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymes
      Survivant depuis 2012

      Thanx. I told my husband yesterday while we were driving 150 mile round trip I never thought about it much. Then it was done and I'm having trouble filling up the time the way I used too.

      over 7 years Flag
  • Nancy Ries Profile
    anonymes
    Survivant depuis 2011
    I totally agree that there is post treatment syndrome. I had only radiation after diagnosis by surgical biopsy/ lumpectomy. For six weeks my life revolved around getting to the hospital every Monday through Friday. Once you are finished you have what seems like extra time in your life. I sat realizing that actively treating my cancer was over and I worried about waiting for it to return. I have had check up appointments with my medical oncologist. As I approach my first mammogram since last year, I am worried and nervous about what "might" be there. Stay strong, stay positive. Keep in touch with us all. We are all here for each other.
    over 7 years Flag
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymes
      Survivant depuis 2012

      Thanx. I told my husband I'm already dreading the first mammogram. That little cloud has been lurking on the horizon. I see my onc and radiologist on Sept 19. Guess I find out then.

      over 7 years Flag
    • Nancy Ries Profile
      anonymes
      Survivant depuis 2011

      I finished radiation in December. I have seen my Medical oncologist every three months since then. I love her. She has a wonderful positive attitude. It is infectious. My first mammogram is August 20. Followed one week later by a first visit since...

      plus

      I finished radiation in December. I have seen my Medical oncologist every three months since then. I love her. She has a wonderful positive attitude. It is infectious. My first mammogram is August 20. Followed one week later by a first visit since surgery last September with my surgeon. Taking my husband along for those. Stay positive. I love the connection I have made with all of the "survivors" on this site.

      over 7 years Flag
    • Anne Marie jacintho Profile
      anonymes
      Survivant depuis 2003

      I kona r

      over 7 years Flag
    • Anne Marie jacintho Profile
      anonymes
      Survivant depuis 2003

      I know exactly how you ladies feel. Plan something fun after the mammogram so you can focus on the fun shopping trip or luncheon instead of the mammogram. I was in pins and needles until I got my results. And I did cry when they told me it was...

      plus

      I know exactly how you ladies feel. Plan something fun after the mammogram so you can focus on the fun shopping trip or luncheon instead of the mammogram. I was in pins and needles until I got my results. And I did cry when they told me it was normal. My surgeon laughed as I was crying. It was a wonderful feeling. Sending Positive thoughts tour way

      over 7 years Flag
    • Nancy Ries Profile
      anonymes
      Survivant depuis 2011

      In the appointment reminder that came in the mail, they say that breast cancer survivors will be given results of the mammogram before we leave that day. They totally understand the nervousness of doing our mammograms!

      over 7 years Flag
  • jennifer lewis Profile
    anonymes
    Survivant depuis 2009
    Absolutely! A year after my diagnosis I had another mammo and sonogram. The sono room is where I got the news, so being back in there was very emotional. It was totally unexpected . I suddenly started crying and that's when I realized I really never would be the same. It does get better with time, though. I am 3 1/2 years out and things don't get me too much anymore.
    about 7 years Comment Flag
  • Thumb avatar default
    anonymes
    Stage 4 Patient
    After everything is over I was a wreck! It's normal for some of us but it can be treated. You may want to talk to a therapist as well. If I could go to mine everyday I would lol.
    over 7 years Comment Flag

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