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Conclusion

 
Conclusion

Chapter: 7 - Conclusion

Subchapter: 1 - Conclusion

The first step down this new road is learning about your diagnosis and treatment options, which you have done by watching Beyond the Shock®. Embarking on this journey requires you to not only be informed, but also to realize that you don’t have to face this alone.

Family, friends, and other breast cancer patients are your shield and safety net, carefully knit together to strengthen you. Alongside them, your triumphs over new hills will be celebrated; your struggles through new valleys endured. They can help you see past the shadows, reminding you that each step–each moment–is precious. Leaning on them for emotional and physical needs isn’t a sign of weakness, but rather a kind of healing for you and for them.

Beyond the Shock® is more than just videos; it is an online community of women around the world who are wrestling with similar emotions, questions, decisions, experiences, and fears.
You can ask questions and give answers. You can watch stories of hope and share your own.

Beyond the shock of breast cancer, there is still life.

Related Questions

  • Thumb avatar default

    Is there a spot in your site for mothers who lost her daughter to breast cancer?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 9 years 2 answers
    • Catherine Nodurft Profile
      anonymous
      Family Member or Loved One

      So sorry about your daughter! I would recommend you visit our online support community at www.MyNBCF.org, it is an amazing support community of breast cancer survivors, friends and family.

      Comment
    • Catherine Nodurft Profile
      anonymous
      Family Member or Loved One

      Also, we have a list of support resources at http://breastcan.cr/fZQzP6.

      Comment
  • Judy Carr Profile

    Diagnosed with breast cancer yesterday - how do I tell my kids?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 8 years 7 answers
    • View all 7 answers
    • lynda dew Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      That was the hardest thing about any of it. We sat our two children down. We named two of our friends who went through the same thing. We told them that I went to the doctor and we had some news. My daughter started to cry and sobbed "no, no". I held her and reminded her that those two women...

      more

      That was the hardest thing about any of it. We sat our two children down. We named two of our friends who went through the same thing. We told them that I went to the doctor and we had some news. My daughter started to cry and sobbed "no, no". I held her and reminded her that those two women fought hard and they won the fight and I was going to do the same. My daughter said "you don't even look sick". I explained that that day was the sickest I was going to be. I told them that when I looked tired, lost my hair and looked really sick to say a prayer and thank God for chemo because the worse I looked, meant that it was working. Five months of chemo, lumpectomy, bi-later mastectomies and six weeks of radiation, I am in full remission and plan on being here for a long time. Tell your kids, comfort them, be strong and keep them involved. They won't be scared if you are honest (what they can handle at their age).. Good luck:). I'm praying for you.

      1 comment
    • Evelyn Heilbrunn Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2012

      Ah, Judy. I've been there, twice. You don't mention how old your kids are. The first time, mine were 7, 5, and 5 (twins). The second time they were 18, 16, and 16. The words I used were different each time, but the message was the same. I have great doctors, I trust them, and they tell me...

      more

      Ah, Judy. I've been there, twice. You don't mention how old your kids are. The first time, mine were 7, 5, and 5 (twins). The second time they were 18, 16, and 16. The words I used were different each time, but the message was the same. I have great doctors, I trust them, and they tell me that they're going to give me the best treatment they can so I can get better. I never made any promises, but I gave them as much hope as I could. I'm on the other side of it all now, having finished chemo in March. I'm alive and well. No matter what age your kids are, they understand more than you think -- in their own way. They take their cues from you (and your partner, if you have one). Despite my own fear I tried my best to stay positive for them. They wanted frequent reassurance that everything was going to be ok. While I didn't quite go that far, I consistently told them that I was getting the best care I could so I could get well.
      It's very hard, I know. Best of luck and please send any other questions you might have.

      Comment
  • ann c Profile

    My sister will start her first chemo next week, what help you think she needs the most besides taking care of her 6 yr old girl?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 8 years 7 answers
    • View all 7 answers
    • julie s Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 2A Patient

      I had my first treatment two weeks ago. My sister has been a rock star... Drover to chemo, took me to store, picked up my scripts, took me for my neulesta shot, brought me food, made sure I took my meds on time, told me jokes, etc! I will never be able to tell her how much I appreciate her...

      more

      I had my first treatment two weeks ago. My sister has been a rock star... Drover to chemo, took me to store, picked up my scripts, took me for my neulesta shot, brought me food, made sure I took my meds on time, told me jokes, etc! I will never be able to tell her how much I appreciate her support!

      Comment
    • Erin Timlin Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      Sorry...hit return... Anyway, I was hungry but couldn't bear to cook. It was one huge thing at a tough time of day that helped more than I anticipated. I have two little kids myself, so I think meals may help your sister! Good luck.

      Comment
  • anonymous Profile

    Here's my question...I just turned 33, found out last night that I will have a bilateral and chemo can anyone help me out on what to expect as far as the chemo and reconstruction or any other helpful information?

    Asked by anonymous

    Patient
    over 7 years 5 answers
    • View all 5 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Anonymous, I know we are all so sorry to hear at such a young age, you have breast cancer. Every woman's breast cancer is different on a cellular level. There are many factors and findings that go into the decision how your treatment will go. It depends on what type of breast cancer you have,...

      more

      Anonymous, I know we are all so sorry to hear at such a young age, you have breast cancer. Every woman's breast cancer is different on a cellular level. There are many factors and findings that go into the decision how your treatment will go. It depends on what type of breast cancer you have, the stage, the grade, and your age. You are in limbo right now because you are still being tested. Once your team have your treatment schedule set, your life will settle down. I can tell you, where you are right now is lousy. We really don't know what your treatment will be. As far as chemotherapy, everybody handles it differently. Some people it is tough, other people, like myself, it was relatively easy. They have very good druges to keep you from getting nauseated. You WILL lose your hair. That is a --for sure--. It starts to drop out at about 2 weeks after your first treatment. I did not have reconstruction but usually if you have a mastectomy and you are going to have reconstruction, they place tissue expanders to make a pocket for implants. There are other types of reconstruction and that will be discussed with you depending on your specific circumstance.
      A suggestion for you while you are going through this diagnosis phase, take a spouse, relative and good friend to take notes and listen to what is being said. I did not remember a third of what was said. Thankfully, my husband and best friend came along to help me through this tough time. You have got to be your own best advocate. You have got to speak up, ask questions, and make sure you are getting the correct medication. Every woman's treatment will be different because it is not individualized for each woman. It is a long journey, but you will come out the other side a much stronger woman. Breast cancer treatment ain't for wimps! Hang in there.... you WILL make it!
      Take care, Sharon

      2 comments
    • sandra hayley Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2005 and had a mastectomy and chemo in 2006, had breast cancer again in 2011, had surgery and radiation. Think positive! You can beat this! I also found out I have the brca2 gene(breast cancer gene) I am now 41 and trying to stay positive and eat healthy and...

      more

      I was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2005 and had a mastectomy and chemo in 2006, had breast cancer again in 2011, had surgery and radiation. Think positive! You can beat this! I also found out I have the brca2 gene(breast cancer gene) I am now 41 and trying to stay positive and eat healthy and exercise regularly.

      1 comment

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