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Introduction

 
Introduction

Chapter: 1 - Introduction

Subchapter: 1 - Introduction

Each of our lives is a story. We journey along a road of experiences and emotions, passing significant milestones along the way. When suddenly, the road beneath our feet takes a sharp turn, breaking from what was once certain.

Breast cancer causes this break. Perspective ruthlessly shifts; you and your loved ones see the road differently than before.

However, we see the road has not ended–it continues on through new hills and new valleys. We know that life has done this before, curiously forcing us into foreign places and down roads that seemed impassable. Yet somehow these challenges become fertile soil where seeds of strength, love, and resilience mature and grow strong.

Remember, this is a road that has been traversed by thousands of women, women with full lives and loved ones. Women whose dreams–whose lives–were threatened by breast cancer. Women who now share stories of endurance and hope.

Beyond the Shock® is first and foremost a resource for women who have been diagnosed with breast cancer. Secondly, it is for their loved ones to gain a better understanding of the disease and to feel a stronger sense of connection. Finally, it is for doctors to reinforce their instruction and advice.

This is the first of a series of videos, divided up into chapters and sub-chapters. These videos will provide information for you to process, share and use to your own benefit. You will learn about breast cancer: it’s types and stages, how it grows, how it is diagnosed, and how it is treated. More than anything else, Beyond the Shock® is a place to gain knowledge for today and receive hope for tomorrow.

Related Questions

  • Connie Larson Profile

    How many different Types of Breast Cancer are there?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 5 years 3 answers
    • Life is Good! Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2003

      Breastcancer.org is a great resource and explains the different kinds of breast cancer. Keep the questions coming! We are here for you!

      Comment
    • Lou Cam Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      Too many

      Comment
  • Alglen Thelex Garay Profile

    hello... my mom was advised by her oncologist after the radial mastectomy to have Herceptin every 3 weeks for 13 sessions... what should we expect during the treatment...

    Asked by anonymous

    Family Member or Loved One
    about 6 years 2 answers
    • Erin Timlin Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      I have been on herceptin since last Jan and have 3 more sessions and I have not had one problem! Honestly, it will be such an advantage to her. My oncologist described herceptin as a "home run drug" in cancer treatment in the last 10 years. He said it's such an incredible advancement and women...

      more

      I have been on herceptin since last Jan and have 3 more sessions and I have not had one problem! Honestly, it will be such an advantage to her. My oncologist described herceptin as a "home run drug" in cancer treatment in the last 10 years. He said it's such an incredible advancement and women with HER2 tumors now have a great prognosis. Encourage her to consider it!

      Comment
    • celien thorne Profile
      anonymous
      Patient

      The herceptin is tolerable , it does give some side effects like runny nose , brittle nails , shortness of breath and stomach issues maybe a little tired then it passes .. I have been on it for about 9 months n counting . I just ran a 10k on turkey day and that was a day after herceptin ! Woo...

      more

      The herceptin is tolerable , it does give some side effects like runny nose , brittle nails , shortness of breath and stomach issues maybe a little tired then it passes .. I have been on it for about 9 months n counting . I just ran a 10k on turkey day and that was a day after herceptin ! Woo hoo! exercise is a great thing to do to help us heal at any age , even walking or whatever activity ur mom might enjoy maybe u can do together. One day at a time :-)

      3 comments
  • Thumb avatar default

    I am a one year survivor this month. I started out stage 1 and ended up stage4 because a "tiny" spot was found on my sternum, which is now gone due to radiation. What I don't completely understand is why didn't I have chemo?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 8 years 1 answer
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Family Member or Loved One

      That is a good question for your treating physician. Every situation is different, and therefore should be treated differently. I went to a conference earlier this year and the doctor on the panel suggested that it is almost impossible to even measure treatment data in regards to cancer. He...

      more

      That is a good question for your treating physician. Every situation is different, and therefore should be treated differently. I went to a conference earlier this year and the doctor on the panel suggested that it is almost impossible to even measure treatment data in regards to cancer. He said we should record data in narrative form when talking about cancer, instead of numbers and facts. This is because cancer is a disease of abnormality in an individual. That abnormality can manifest itself in a number of different ways, and therefore, it requires a unique and individual approach to its treatment. I know this is a long answer, but I hope it helps you open up a dialogue with you and your doctor. They can probably better explain why your treatment journey was different and address your concerns about chemo. I really hope this helps!

      1 comment
  • Carly Zehner Profile

    My mother is going to start her 3-month treatment of TCH next week. Has anyone been through this treatment? If so, what where your side effects during treatment?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 7 years 1 answer
    • Rotem Adar Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Just confirming that by TCH you mean Taxotere, Carboplatin and Herceptin. I just finished my chemo regimen in January. Everyone is different but I had food aversions, weight gain from the steroids, my hair fell out (though not completely, I never actually went bald, but I did shave it GI Jane...

      more

      Just confirming that by TCH you mean Taxotere, Carboplatin and Herceptin. I just finished my chemo regimen in January. Everyone is different but I had food aversions, weight gain from the steroids, my hair fell out (though not completely, I never actually went bald, but I did shave it GI Jane style), and the worst side effect was from the Neulasta shot (white blood cell booster) shot I had to take the day after chemo. It causes flu like symptoms. Oh, a few other symptoms from the chemo was a lot of exhaustion and fatigue, and I'm not sure if this tied in to the fatigue but it hurt me too much to wear high heels. I'm sure it had to do with my body being so tired. Hope this helps!

      2 comments

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