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Introduction

 
Introduction

Chapter: 1 - Introduction

Subchapter: 1 - Introduction

Each of our lives is a story. We journey along a road of experiences and emotions, passing significant milestones along the way. When suddenly, the road beneath our feet takes a sharp turn, breaking from what was once certain.

Breast cancer causes this break. Perspective ruthlessly shifts; you and your loved ones see the road differently than before.

However, we see the road has not ended–it continues on through new hills and new valleys. We know that life has done this before, curiously forcing us into foreign places and down roads that seemed impassable. Yet somehow these challenges become fertile soil where seeds of strength, love, and resilience mature and grow strong.

Remember, this is a road that has been traversed by thousands of women, women with full lives and loved ones. Women whose dreams–whose lives–were threatened by breast cancer. Women who now share stories of endurance and hope.

Beyond the Shock® is first and foremost a resource for women who have been diagnosed with breast cancer. Secondly, it is for their loved ones to gain a better understanding of the disease and to feel a stronger sense of connection. Finally, it is for doctors to reinforce their instruction and advice.

This is the first of a series of videos, divided up into chapters and sub-chapters. These videos will provide information for you to process, share and use to your own benefit. You will learn about breast cancer: it’s types and stages, how it grows, how it is diagnosed, and how it is treated. More than anything else, Beyond the Shock® is a place to gain knowledge for today and receive hope for tomorrow.

Related Questions

  • Chelsea Thurston Profile

    what kind of breast cancer signs should you look for

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 5 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Chelsea,
      If you look on this site, there will be a list of breast cancer symptoms. The best thing you can do for yourself is a monthly self exam. If you notice something that is out of the ordinary for you, have it checked immediately. I had an inverted nipple, but it had been like that for...

      more

      Chelsea,
      If you look on this site, there will be a list of breast cancer symptoms. The best thing you can do for yourself is a monthly self exam. If you notice something that is out of the ordinary for you, have it checked immediately. I had an inverted nipple, but it had been like that for several years. My breast had some pain and itching. I had regular mammograms. Seven months after my mammogram I found a lump, and immediately went into my doctor. I knew it was cancer because the lump was different from my "regular lumps." There are several different types of breast cancer and not all form a lump. The symptoms can be different. That is why if you have something happening to your breasts that is not normal, have it checked.
      I was treated, and am fine. No cancer and I am seven years cancer free. The key is to find cancer if it is there and get treated. It isn't a death sentence. Take care, Sharon

      1 comment
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I can tell u my story. I had an annual mammogram in 2012. Dr saw suspicious cluster of microcalcifications. I had a biopsy done & they turned out to b cancerous. I had no symptoms, signs or lumps in my breast. My cancer stage was 0 which is very early detection thank GOD. so if your looking for...

      more

      I can tell u my story. I had an annual mammogram in 2012. Dr saw suspicious cluster of microcalcifications. I had a biopsy done & they turned out to b cancerous. I had no symptoms, signs or lumps in my breast. My cancer stage was 0 which is very early detection thank GOD. so if your looking for signs I had none.

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    Can you work while receiving radiation?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 7 years 13 answers
    • View all 13 answers
    • L Parker Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I went after work and then was able to rest when I got home.

      1 comment
    • Cheryl Wornham Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Yes I did had my treatments in early morning then headed to work wasent bad at all

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    I was just diagnosed with invasive lobular carcinoma grade 2. Anyone out there with same situation? I am leaning towards lumpectomy, but wondering if it is the right way to go?

    Asked by anonymous

    almost 8 years 13 answers
    • View all 13 answers
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I opted for a bi lateral mastectomy, it gave me more peace of mind and I am glad I did it.

      2 comments
    • Diana Foster Payne Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 4 Patient

      It would depend on so many different things. You mentioned your tumor is grade 2. Do you know what stage you are? Are you HER2 - or ? BRACA? What do your other tests results say?

      1 comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    Anyone have a chemo modification? Doc says its normal. I've completed 4/6 bearable tx but ended up with a fever & dehydrated after #4. Doc says if he doesn't do a mod I'll end up in the hospital, he's reducing my dose by 25% for last 2 tx, this normal?

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 2A Patient
    over 7 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Isabel Souchet Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2010

      I had to stop my chemo at 5 tx instead of 6, i was just too sick n my blood work was awful. My onco felt that 5 was enough as i had a very small ICD tumor and would still had another 9 months of herceptin. It is very common, from what i understand, to modify treatment plan.

      Comment
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Sonia,
      As I call it ~a course correction~ they do happen all the time. It is quite common if a woman can't tolerate the chemotherapy, oncologists adjust the dosages or how many courses a patient has. Sounds like you have a very wise, intelligent, thoughtful oncologist. Don't worry, he is doing...

      more

      Sonia,
      As I call it ~a course correction~ they do happen all the time. It is quite common if a woman can't tolerate the chemotherapy, oncologists adjust the dosages or how many courses a patient has. Sounds like you have a very wise, intelligent, thoughtful oncologist. Don't worry, he is doing his job well. Take care, Sharon

      Comment

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