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Penny's Story

About her story

"I knew I had to take this horrible, bad thing and turn it in to something positive."

In March 2010, Penny was diagnosed with Stage IIB Triple-negative breast cancer.

"There's something about when you've been diagnosed with breast cancer, it's like being elected to a club that you never wanted to be a part of," says Penny. "But, when you're there, you're really glad there's other people with you."

A busy salon owner, Penny realized that her diagnosis and treatment would completely change her lifestyle. But, through breast cancer, she learned that it was her family and support that meant most to her.

Watch Penny's story and learn how a rare form of breast cancer changed her life and helped her realize that all things work out for good in the end.

Related Questions

  • Thumb avatar default

    I had a mammogram last week that read normal, but I have a palpable lump in the 11 o'clock area in the outer quadrant. It's about the size of a grape, non movable, firm, and tender. I have a VERY strong family history of various cancers. What next?

    Asked by anonymous

    about 8 years 14 answers
    • View all 14 answers
    • Diana Foster Payne Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 4 Patient

      Hi Amy, while mammograms detect a good deal of lumps...there are too many that are missed. I was always very diligent in having my mammograms with ultrasounds as well. Due to micro calcifications found, I was having one every six months so they could "monitor" any changes. Five months after my...

      more

      Hi Amy, while mammograms detect a good deal of lumps...there are too many that are missed. I was always very diligent in having my mammograms with ultrasounds as well. Due to micro calcifications found, I was having one every six months so they could "monitor" any changes. Five months after my last "clean" mammo....I found my lump. It was firm, my breast was swollen, itchy, and my nipple had inverted. I ended up having a biopsy and was diagnosed with Invasive Ductal Cancer. After all my testing was completed I was told I was in stage 3C. My cancer should have been detected so much sooner. Like Sharon, it was missed. You're welcome to read my profile story. While most lumps end up being benign....you always want to get each lump tested thoroughly! I agree with asking for an MRI. Then additional testing if needed. We must be proactive with our health and make our doctors listen!! Hugs Amy & keep us posted.

      2 comments
    • Tiffani Warila Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Go back to your doc and ask for an ultrasound and/or MRI followed by a biopsy if needed and if they say no, go for a second opinion. If you are not satisfied with the answers you get don't stop till you are. It's your life! Best of luck, I wish you the best!

      Comment
  • Janeen Rosado Profile

    How long has herceptin been used to treat breast cancer?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 8 years 1 answer
    • Dawn Sullivan Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 3A Patient

      Herceptin has been FDA approved since 1998 and there is a very good movie called living proof about the doctor who found the protein.

      1 comment
  • Denise Hardnock Profile

    How do people feel while they are on Anastrozole? I feel horrible sometimes. I think I'm getting de-hydrated by the constant sweating and extreme heat outside.

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 8 years 3 answers
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2012

      I've been on Femara since May. Have to move around to fight that blah, yucky feeling. Haven't figured out if I feel depressed , fatigued or old. Worse after lunch so I don't fight it and lie down. Hoping it will get better but the alternative is not an option for me. I thought I was the only one...

      more

      I've been on Femara since May. Have to move around to fight that blah, yucky feeling. Haven't figured out if I feel depressed , fatigued or old. Worse after lunch so I don't fight it and lie down. Hoping it will get better but the alternative is not an option for me. I thought I was the only one who had these feelings until y'all's post. Now I kind of feel normal. Thanks for the question. :-)

      6 comments
    • Nancy Ries Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      I have been on Arimidex since the end of December,2011. Some days I feel as though my "get up and go" has gotten up and left. I try to get to the gym three days a week. This summer that has proven to be a challenge. I have always tried to drink 6-8 glasses of water daily. If I have nothing...

      more

      I have been on Arimidex since the end of December,2011. Some days I feel as though my "get up and go" has gotten up and left. I try to get to the gym three days a week. This summer that has proven to be a challenge. I have always tried to drink 6-8 glasses of water daily. If I have nothing planned and sit down in front of the television in the afternoon, nap time is in the near future.

      2 comments
  • Christine Kenyon Profile

    Treatments for triple n?

    Asked by anonymous

    Patient
    over 6 years 5 answers
    • View all 5 answers
    • Betti A Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      Have you met with any doctors yet; surgeon, oncologist, etc? They will come up with a plan designed just for you.

      Comment
    • Brandi Mixon Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2012

      Betti is right, your medical team will come up with a plan that is designed just for you. I was diagnosed with TNBC and I had 6 rounds of Taxotere, Adriamycin, and Cytoxan (TAC). I did not have to have any radiation because I chose to have a double mastectomy. Talk openly with your medical team....

      more

      Betti is right, your medical team will come up with a plan that is designed just for you. I was diagnosed with TNBC and I had 6 rounds of Taxotere, Adriamycin, and Cytoxan (TAC). I did not have to have any radiation because I chose to have a double mastectomy. Talk openly with your medical team. Don't be afraid to ask any questions no matter how insignificant you think it might be. God bless you.

      Comment
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