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Bonnie's Story

About her story

"There's some things in life you have to share. You have to have someone to lean on, and they'll help you get through."

After performing a self-breast exam, Bonnie Brooks discovered a lump and immediately scheduled an appointment with her doctor. On September 11, 2008, she was diagnosed with Stage 3 metastatic breast cancer. With a difficult treatment regiment ahead, including chemotherapy, she realized that she could not face breast cancer alone.

"I was always very independent and I've learned with breast cancer you can't always be independent," says Brooks. "You have to be dependent on people to help you through."

Hear Bonnie's inspirational story and learn more about how she overcame breast cancer.

Related Questions

  • Kim Curry Profile

    What types of mastectomy surgery have reconstruction done at same time?

    Asked by anonymous

    Patient
    about 7 years 1 answer
    • Anne Marie jacintho Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2003

      Hi Kim I think it all depends on the type if breast cancer, treatment needed and your surgeon from my own experience I had reconstruction at the same time of my mastectomies I had DCIS bilateral mastectomies were my treatment of choice. Having the bilateral mastectomies I did not need radiation...

      more

      Hi Kim I think it all depends on the type if breast cancer, treatment needed and your surgeon from my own experience I had reconstruction at the same time of my mastectomies I had DCIS bilateral mastectomies were my treatment of choice. Having the bilateral mastectomies I did not need radiation or chemo If you are considering reconstruction find a plastic surgeon that either specializes in breast reconstruction or will work along with your general surgeon to do the reconstruction. Some surgeons do not want to do the surgery at the same time as reimbursement will also be shared so they prefer to do the procedures separately for better reimbursement

      1 comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    I had a mammogram last week that read normal, but I have a palpable lump in the 11 o'clock area in the outer quadrant. It's about the size of a grape, non movable, firm, and tender. I have a VERY strong family history of various cancers. What next?

    Asked by anonymous

    over 7 years 14 answers
    • View all 14 answers
    • Diana Foster Payne Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 4 Patient

      Hi Amy, while mammograms detect a good deal of lumps...there are too many that are missed. I was always very diligent in having my mammograms with ultrasounds as well. Due to micro calcifications found, I was having one every six months so they could "monitor" any changes. Five months after my...

      more

      Hi Amy, while mammograms detect a good deal of lumps...there are too many that are missed. I was always very diligent in having my mammograms with ultrasounds as well. Due to micro calcifications found, I was having one every six months so they could "monitor" any changes. Five months after my last "clean" mammo....I found my lump. It was firm, my breast was swollen, itchy, and my nipple had inverted. I ended up having a biopsy and was diagnosed with Invasive Ductal Cancer. After all my testing was completed I was told I was in stage 3C. My cancer should have been detected so much sooner. Like Sharon, it was missed. You're welcome to read my profile story. While most lumps end up being benign....you always want to get each lump tested thoroughly! I agree with asking for an MRI. Then additional testing if needed. We must be proactive with our health and make our doctors listen!! Hugs Amy & keep us posted.

      2 comments
    • Tiffani Warila Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Go back to your doc and ask for an ultrasound and/or MRI followed by a biopsy if needed and if they say no, go for a second opinion. If you are not satisfied with the answers you get don't stop till you are. It's your life! Best of luck, I wish you the best!

      Comment
  • Alice Fingers Profile

    What are the best foods to eat when on chemo?

    Asked by anonymous

    Survivor since 2007
    over 7 years 6 answers
    • View all 6 answers
    • Nicole Rodgers Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Bagels , bread, fruit, frostys

      Comment
    • Ali S Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      Everyone's different... The first few times, watermelon was a saving grave for me. And plenty of fluids. I really did well with bland food--plain whole wheat pasta with plain red sauce and cheese, crackers with cream cheese, pretzels. But tried to get fruits and veggies too. I could only...

      more

      Everyone's different... The first few times, watermelon was a saving grave for me. And plenty of fluids. I really did well with bland food--plain whole wheat pasta with plain red sauce and cheese, crackers with cream cheese, pretzels. But tried to get fruits and veggies too. I could only tolerate broccoli for the first few days after and I eat tons of veggies normally

      Comment
  • Serena Neff Profile

    Are there any side effects when just on Herceptin?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 7 years 6 answers
    • View all 6 answers
    • Sue Rice Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 4 Patient

      I am on Herceptin and Femara the main side effects from the herceptin that I have is sore crusty nose and tiredness sometimes I get breathless. Occasionally my ankles seem to swell as well all joint pain I have is from the Femara.

      Comment
    • Isabel Souchet Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2010

      I too was a bit breathless, tired . But nothing compared to the chemo. It's very doable.

      Comment
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