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Bonnie's Story

About her story

"There's some things in life you have to share. You have to have someone to lean on, and they'll help you get through."

After performing a self-breast exam, Bonnie Brooks discovered a lump and immediately scheduled an appointment with her doctor. On September 11, 2008, she was diagnosed with Stage 3 metastatic breast cancer. With a difficult treatment regiment ahead, including chemotherapy, she realized that she could not face breast cancer alone.

"I was always very independent and I've learned with breast cancer you can't always be independent," says Brooks. "You have to be dependent on people to help you through."

Hear Bonnie's inspirational story and learn more about how she overcame breast cancer.

Related Questions

  • Thumb avatar default

    I had a biopsy on Friday. They hurt me bad. The tumor was located on top of a muscle and the Dr. hit the muscle 3 times during the procedure. I made her stop. Should I change surgeons?

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 0 Patient
    over 6 years 7 answers
    • View all 7 answers
    • Jo Norwood Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2012

      I had 4 cores. My surgeon did it. I had a numbing shots directly to the area. Didn't feel the incision for the gun. The first two cores were uncomfortable but the third was excruciating . Dr apologized and said the tumor couldn't be numbed. He said it was the densest tumor he had ever biopsies....

      more

      I had 4 cores. My surgeon did it. I had a numbing shots directly to the area. Didn't feel the incision for the gun. The first two cores were uncomfortable but the third was excruciating . Dr apologized and said the tumor couldn't be numbed. He said it was the densest tumor he had ever biopsies. The fourth hurt like$&@?. He ask me if I could take the 4th to get the best info possible. My suspicious area was the size of a golf ball and the tumor turned out to be 2.7 cm. he told me he was 99%sure it was cancer. Two weeks later I had surgery. I never worried about spread because I had cancer already. If it was so aggressive the biopsy could spread it , that would be the least of my fears. If you don't trust your dr change, but keep in mind sometimes our disease presents them with the dilemma of doing harm .

      Comment
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      I would have completely lost confidence..... Make a change, and take care, Sharon

      Comment
  • shen cruces Profile

    I had my mastectomy and axillary l nodes taken out on feb 22nd. No real pain just a weird burning/tingling/numb sensation under the arm and down the bicep. Anyone else experience this? Did it get better? How long did it take?

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 3A Patient
    almost 8 years 6 answers
    • View all 6 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      It sounds as if there was a nerve that was disturbed in the area of your surgery. The burning, tingling is a sign of that. It should slowly get better with time. Nerve fibers take a while to return to normal. Be SURE to talk to your doctor about this and have him/her explain it to you.

      Comment
    • Cheryl Wornham Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Yes I did have a node taken it was aug of last year and I still have some strange feeling in my arm not sure how long it will be like this I would talk to your Dr. about it
      Take care

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    I need help dealing with breast cancer!

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 8 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      I think you almost go through a grieving process.... terror, disbelief, anger, and you finally come to a place of acceptance. I found unbelievable strength within myself, more than I ever thought was "in there." The most fearful time is waiting for the tests, once you find out your plan, there...

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      I think you almost go through a grieving process.... terror, disbelief, anger, and you finally come to a place of acceptance. I found unbelievable strength within myself, more than I ever thought was "in there." The most fearful time is waiting for the tests, once you find out your plan, there is nothing more that is unknown as far as your condition. It is almost like you say to yourself... "I've got breast cancer, so now what are WE going to do about it?" I think there are a lot of women who try to make "lemon-aid out of our batch of lemons." I shared my entire experience with my community to reassure other women IF you are diagnosed, it is not the end of your life. I really pushed other women to get mammograms because early detection is the key. You pretty much go into warrior mode, put on those big girl panties and charge ahead. You make a whole new batch of friends in the process and you will be surprised how many women have been through treatment years ago and just never said anything. There is a lot of support on this board, such wonderful women, such brave, strong, women. So many have children so they have extra incentive to march bravely through the battle. You will have your bad days too but they pass. You keep your eye on the future because you will get back to your normal life. This is my fifth year post-treatment, and I just had another clean check-up last week. This is one of life's experiences that you would never choose to have but there is something oddly positive about it. You find a new you inside yourself. It is survival, strength, courage, and camaraderie in it's purest form. Hang in there... you are on a journey but you don't have to go it alone. You have plenty of company. Fight-On Warrior Girl! Take care and big huge healing hugs, Sharon

      3 comments
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Always remember the sick little kids at st Jude's that gets me every time

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    My mother has stage 3 breast cancer. Since her mastectomy two weeks ago she's become depressed. Today she didn't even want to get out of bed. I have heard that a person's attitude directly affects their prognosis. How can I help her?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 6 years 8 answers
    • View all 8 answers
    • Diana Foster Payne Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 4 Patient

      Your Mom just had something happen to her that is devastating to most woman. Cancer sucks. And yes....women can feel different degrees of depression afterwards. And sometimes you just don't want to get out of bed. Allow her to feel the pain and loss that she's feeling now. Then help her by being...

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      Your Mom just had something happen to her that is devastating to most woman. Cancer sucks. And yes....women can feel different degrees of depression afterwards. And sometimes you just don't want to get out of bed. Allow her to feel the pain and loss that she's feeling now. Then help her by being there and supporting her. Antidepressants have helped me so much. I do believe in thinking positively every moment that I can. But at the same time...I'm only human and do have my down days too. And that's ok.

      Comment
    • Brandi Mixon Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2012

      I had a week of depression after my first chemo. My family all stepped in and told me they were having none of that! My daughter & hubby made sure I got out of the house for at least an hour a day, the rest if my family and friends called or visited giving me encouragement and building me up....

      more

      I had a week of depression after my first chemo. My family all stepped in and told me they were having none of that! My daughter & hubby made sure I got out of the house for at least an hour a day, the rest if my family and friends called or visited giving me encouragement and building me up. Just do the best you can to let her know how much you care and live her. If you can talk to her doctor about it. God bless you!

      Comment
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