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What does it mean when it says 98% live a year with stage 2... when the charts say its a 98% expectancy for 8 years what does that actually mean???

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anonymous

Learning About Breast Cancer over 7 years
 
  • Diana Foster Payne Profile
    anonymous
    Stage 4 Patient
    I agree with Sharon. When I was newly diagnosed I looked at the stats online. For one thing, they're very outdated. And for another, every woman is different. I stopped looking at stats and when I did choose to go online, I looked up survivor stories instead. :)
    over 7 years Flag
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Diana, I am so glad you wrote this. I, too, gained so much from survivor stories and the other junk I just wouldn't waste my time on it. You go girl! I love your positive energy!!! Sharon

      over 7 years Flag
    • Diana Foster Payne Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 4 Patient

      Hugs Sharon....thanks a bunch. :). Yes, love reading survivor stories! Just soak 'em up like a sponge. Lol. It's so vital to hear other women's stories & how they've come out on the other side of this disease. And you've got a ton of positive...

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      Hugs Sharon....thanks a bunch. :). Yes, love reading survivor stories! Just soak 'em up like a sponge. Lol. It's so vital to hear other women's stories & how they've come out on the other side of this disease. And you've got a ton of positive energy yourself!!!

      over 7 years Flag
  • Evelyn Heilbrunn Profile
    anonymous
    Survivor since 2012
    I don't think the statistics are worth the paper they're written on, and I've never paid a lot of attention to them. (I've had breast cancer twice -- first time Stage 1B, this time Stage 2A). Generally, the survival stats go down the more advanced and aggressive the cancer is. In reality, treatments have become so advanced between my 1st bout in 2000 and my second in 2011 that I meet people in the chemo room who have had advanced cancer for several years or more. They come in for regular "boosts" of chemo and go on and live their lives. So don't jump to any conclusions based on statistics. Rely on your doctor and ask him any questions you may have.
    over 7 years Comment Flag
  • Sharon Danielson Profile
    anonymous
    Survivor since 2007
    I can't really tell you about these percentages because if they are from two different sources. They may be evaluating different facts or figures. The thing that used to send me right over the edge was reading too much on the internet. I found it to be horribly depressing so why add to my burden? I just quit doing that and focused on the positive. If I were you, I wouldn't get too wrapped up in statistics. You are NOT a number, you are special and unique! Keep your eye on getting well, and living every minute to fullest. Focus on the good and positive, you will enjoy life a whole lot more. If you have been diagnosed with breast cancer, please remember, we have all been where you are. We are a group of supportive women and prop each other up before, during, and after. Hang in there, darlin' and paste a smile on your face even if you don't feel like it! (lipstick also helps!)
    over 7 years Comment Flag
  • Mary Foti Profile
    anonymous
    Survivor since 2010
    I agree with Sharon and Diana! It is very tempting to look for statistics on the internet. The only web sites my oncologist told me to check were Susan Komen, American Cancer Society and breastcancer.org; however, those sites also cite slightly different stats, depending on what study they are referring to. It takes time, but try not to focus on percentages and survival rates. Instead, focus on doing the treatment your oncologist recommends (get a second opinion if that makes you more comfortable - I did) and getting through it. If you feel you need counseling, don't hesitate to ask for it. I found the emotional devastation of my diagnosis was more difficult than the physical aspects, and doctors (especially surgeons) aren't very good at the emotional component of treatment.
    over 7 years Flag
    • Diana Foster Payne Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 4 Patient

      Hi Mary, you're right, the emotional aspects of cancer are greater than the physical ones. I believe that to be true. Are you finished with treatment? Those are awesome websites!

      over 7 years Flag
    • Mary Foti Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2010

      Sharon, I just finished my final reconstruction surgery last month. Since November 2010, I've had two lumpectomies (did not get clean margins), a mastectomy w/ tissue expander reconstruction followed by implant reconstruction, genetic testing...

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      Sharon, I just finished my final reconstruction surgery last month. Since November 2010, I've had two lumpectomies (did not get clean margins), a mastectomy w/ tissue expander reconstruction followed by implant reconstruction, genetic testing (which said I am BRCA2 ), another mastectomy w/reconstruction (prophylactic), a hysterectomy (also prophylactic), and the final implant surgery. I did not need radiation (finally got clean margins via mastectomy) or chemo (low oncotype dx score). Now I will take Arimidex for 5 years. It has been so hard because my mother recently found out her breast cancer has recurred in her liver and bones. It seems to be a never-ending roller coaster!

      over 7 years Flag
    • Mary Foti Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2010

      Oops, I meant to respond to Diana's comment and said Sharon instead - sorry!

      over 7 years Flag

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