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Introduction

 
Introduction

Chapter: 1 - Introduction

Subchapter: 1 - Introduction

Each of our lives is a story. We journey along a road of experiences and emotions, passing significant milestones along the way. When suddenly, the road beneath our feet takes a sharp turn, breaking from what was once certain.

Breast cancer causes this break. Perspective ruthlessly shifts; you and your loved ones see the road differently than before.

However, we see the road has not ended–it continues on through new hills and new valleys. We know that life has done this before, curiously forcing us into foreign places and down roads that seemed impassable. Yet somehow these challenges become fertile soil where seeds of strength, love, and resilience mature and grow strong.

Remember, this is a road that has been traversed by thousands of women, women with full lives and loved ones. Women whose dreams–whose lives–were threatened by breast cancer. Women who now share stories of endurance and hope.

Beyond the Shock® is first and foremost a resource for women who have been diagnosed with breast cancer. Secondly, it is for their loved ones to gain a better understanding of the disease and to feel a stronger sense of connection. Finally, it is for doctors to reinforce their instruction and advice.

This is the first of a series of videos, divided up into chapters and sub-chapters. These videos will provide information for you to process, share and use to your own benefit. You will learn about breast cancer: it’s types and stages, how it grows, how it is diagnosed, and how it is treated. More than anything else, Beyond the Shock® is a place to gain knowledge for today and receive hope for tomorrow.

Related Questions

  • Thumb avatar default

    Mums has been diagnosed with grade 3 nst. With 6 months of chemo then removal/mammogram after. Parents say everything will be ok but are they protecting me. Is it usual to do chemo first and isn't grade 3 more advance?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 7 years 6 answers
    • View all 6 answers
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2012

      It depends on each individual , but chemo can be first.

      Comment
    • Rita Jo Hayes Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2009

      My strong chemo was first. Then double mass, then follow up with herceptin and hormone therapy. Each person's situation is an individual journey. A good strong support system and positive attitude is very helpful. Good luck to you n your mums.

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    Is there always radiation treatment after a lumpectomy?

    Asked by anonymous

    Patient
    almost 7 years 12 answers
    • View all 12 answers
    • Kathy Crum Profile
      anonymous
      Family Member or Loved One

      The answer is really not an answer at all but rather what you see as the best options for you and your survival and/or risk factors related to the cancer returning. The standard of care across the board seems to be the surgery to remove, followed by chemo, and then radiation. The type, dosage,...

      more

      The answer is really not an answer at all but rather what you see as the best options for you and your survival and/or risk factors related to the cancer returning. The standard of care across the board seems to be the surgery to remove, followed by chemo, and then radiation. The type, dosage, and length of treatment has a lot of factors to consider. In the end it is your individual choice to choose what is best for you and the more you educate yourself about the risks vs benefits vs percentage rates of what that treatment is giving you for a chance of survival and to remain cancer free will arm you with the knowledge to ask informed questions to your oncologist and radiation dr about what exactly those benefits of that treatment are. Keep your spirit up and mind informed. Wishing you the best and will be praying for your full recovery.

      1 comment
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      I am sure there have been some cases but generally speaking, with a lumpectomy comes radiation. You never know if a few cancer cells have taken a hike away the original tumor. Take care, Sharon

      1 comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    I finally accepted my docs advise and I am on Lexapro *antidepressant* - the world seems brighter, but now I don't seem to care if the cancer comes back or not, I feel chemically altered, but I don' t care. Is this normal? radiation girl :)

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 2B Patient
    over 6 years 5 answers
    • View all 5 answers
    • Marianne R. Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      We have to think about the cancer but you can't let it consume you. It is ok to take help because breast cancer is a life altering event. We have to live through it to get to our best selves.

      Comment
    • André Roberts Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 1 Patient

      I am on Effexor and feel the same way. It's better than crying all the time. Prayers to you.

      Comment
  • Helene LaPoint Profile

    I have been diagnose with metastatic breast cancer which spread to the liver they put me on faslodex shots can any body give me some answers on this idc hormone receptor postive her2 neg

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 7 years 1 answer
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Helene,
      I had the same type of breast cancer.... IDC with the same hormone receptive ER+ PR+ Her2- Your tumor feeds off of hormones.... which is good because there are hormone blocking drugs you can take. From what I read, Faslodex is one of those type of drugs for metastatic breast cancer. ...

      more

      Helene,
      I had the same type of breast cancer.... IDC with the same hormone receptive ER+ PR+ Her2- Your tumor feeds off of hormones.... which is good because there are hormone blocking drugs you can take. From what I read, Faslodex is one of those type of drugs for metastatic breast cancer. I am just guessing.... but you will probably be on this type of drug and will have scans to see how the liver tumors shrink. If they don't, they will switch you to another type of hormone blocking drug. Many women are on different types of treatments to shrink tumors before they have surgery. What is your doctor saying about your treatment plan? We have a great big family here on this board. We are always sorry to get more members but it is quite a sisterhood of women who have been there, done that. Each woman's treatment is different from another depending on her particular breast cancer cells. Collectively, we try to help support each other. Hang in there, Helene.... You put on those big girl panties and FIGHT LIKE A GIRL!!!
      Take care, Sharon

      2 comments

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