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Introduction

 
Introduction

Chapter: 1 - Introduction

Subchapter: 1 - Introduction

Each of our lives is a story. We journey along a road of experiences and emotions, passing significant milestones along the way. When suddenly, the road beneath our feet takes a sharp turn, breaking from what was once certain.

Breast cancer causes this break. Perspective ruthlessly shifts; you and your loved ones see the road differently than before.

However, we see the road has not ended–it continues on through new hills and new valleys. We know that life has done this before, curiously forcing us into foreign places and down roads that seemed impassable. Yet somehow these challenges become fertile soil where seeds of strength, love, and resilience mature and grow strong.

Remember, this is a road that has been traversed by thousands of women, women with full lives and loved ones. Women whose dreams–whose lives–were threatened by breast cancer. Women who now share stories of endurance and hope.

Beyond the Shock® is first and foremost a resource for women who have been diagnosed with breast cancer. Secondly, it is for their loved ones to gain a better understanding of the disease and to feel a stronger sense of connection. Finally, it is for doctors to reinforce their instruction and advice.

This is the first of a series of videos, divided up into chapters and sub-chapters. These videos will provide information for you to process, share and use to your own benefit. You will learn about breast cancer: it’s types and stages, how it grows, how it is diagnosed, and how it is treated. More than anything else, Beyond the Shock® is a place to gain knowledge for today and receive hope for tomorrow.

Related Questions

  • Peter P Profile

    do you believe there should male breast cancer awareness and education programs made available for men and their partners?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 7 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Diana Foster Payne Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 4 Patient

      Yes, definitely do! I don't think enough men are aware that they can get breast cancer. And I have read about doctors dismissing their male patients or misdiagnosing them... and then what occurs, is the cancer is found in a late stage. This time of year is the perfect time for people to help...

      more

      Yes, definitely do! I don't think enough men are aware that they can get breast cancer. And I have read about doctors dismissing their male patients or misdiagnosing them... and then what occurs, is the cancer is found in a late stage. This time of year is the perfect time for people to help bring more awareness by writing an article for your local newspaper, congressman, etc.

      Comment
    • Peter P Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Thanks Diana. I live in Canada. I found a small lump in my left breast the the week of June. I was operated on September 1, complete mastectomy and Sentinel lymph node. I was advised yesterday that I have to back in 2 weeks for another surgery to remove more lymph nodes. Then chemo and/ or...

      more

      Thanks Diana. I live in Canada. I found a small lump in my left breast the the week of June. I was operated on September 1, complete mastectomy and Sentinel lymph node. I was advised yesterday that I have to back in 2 weeks for another surgery to remove more lymph nodes. Then chemo and/ or radiation. Very discouraging but i am glad I'm alive.

      3 comments
  • Brandi Carey Profile

    How do you read and understand a pathology report? My doctor wasnt much help.

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 6 years 6 answers
    • View all 6 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Brandi,
      If you can share it with us, we could help decipher it. They usually tell the type, location, size, stage, grade... which you already shared with us. Many times, if you can talk to a nurse in the doctor's office, they can take it down a notch for you. In some practices, or clinics,...

      more

      Brandi,
      If you can share it with us, we could help decipher it. They usually tell the type, location, size, stage, grade... which you already shared with us. Many times, if you can talk to a nurse in the doctor's office, they can take it down a notch for you. In some practices, or clinics, they have an R.N. who helps guide you through the process. They have lots of experience explaining what the pathology report or any other report says. Be sure to take somebody with you when you have other --meet-the-doctor-- appointments. It is freaking comfusing to take it all in. Hang in there..... take care, Sharon

      3 comments
    • Alice Klobukowski Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 2A Patient

      I sat down at the computer and googled each term I didn't understand. I made notes and asked about anything that I still dint understand.

      Comment
  • Matt Wallace Profile

    Can you get alzhiemer conditions from breast cancer?

    Asked by anonymous

    Family Member or Loved One
    over 7 years Answer
  • Helen Alexander Profile

    I have a 9mm mass in right breast waiting to get biopsy how often are mass this size cancer

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 4 years 2 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Helen, many, many more biopsy's are done that turn out to be benign, than cancer. 9 mm isn't very big. My tumor was 2.3cm. It is awful to wait for these things. Try to stay busy. Keep in mind, many more of these lumps and bumps we find are benign. You really can't tell from the size...

      more

      Helen, many, many more biopsy's are done that turn out to be benign, than cancer. 9 mm isn't very big. My tumor was 2.3cm. It is awful to wait for these things. Try to stay busy. Keep in mind, many more of these lumps and bumps we find are benign. You really can't tell from the size of something if it is cancer or not, it needs to be biopsied to see what type of cells are contained in the tissue. Take care, Sharon

      1 comment
    • Mary Navarro Profile
      anonymous
      Patient

      Is the doctor sending you for a biopsy because they saw something in your mammogram? The doctor probably just want to make sure that there's no cancer cells. Are you getting a needle biopsy?

      3 comments

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