loading... close
  • Learn

    about breast cancer

    Watch up to seven video chapters that explain the types and stages, diagnosis, and treatment of breast cancer.

    view
  • Ask

    questions & get answers

    Browse for answers from medical experts, survivors and patients or ask a question of your own.

    view
  • Hear

    real stories from people

    View real video stories from people that have been diagnosed, received treatment, and survived breast cancer.

    view
  • Bobbi Buzzell Profile

    Any 10 Yr survivors of IDC er pr posts her - stage 2b

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 17 hours 1 answer
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Hey Bobbi,
      I am at over 9 years! I was a 2B, er+pr+her2- cancer in 1 node. Rather aggressive 2-3 grade. Had mastectomy, no reconstruction, 4 rounds of AC and 5 years of Letrozole. At the time of my diagnosis, my oncologist had just returned from a seminar where a study had been completed. It...

      more

      Hey Bobbi,
      I am at over 9 years! I was a 2B, er+pr+her2- cancer in 1 node. Rather aggressive 2-3 grade. Had mastectomy, no reconstruction, 4 rounds of AC and 5 years of Letrozole. At the time of my diagnosis, my oncologist had just returned from a seminar where a study had been completed. It was found that my particular cancer long term survival did not benefit from the 10 rounds of Taxol that was normally being given after the 4 rounds of AC. Oncologist said for me, Taxol would not add any benefit and would actually cause more damage to my body. I bless him for being to forward thinking and not subjecting me to additional treatment that he believed would not help me. My life is full and rich with so much. I cherish each day. There is hope! Take care, Sharon

      1 comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    I just found out that I have grade 1 invasive ductal carcinoma. Does anyone know the prognosis for this or what I should expect next? Is there anything I should do now to prepare and to not get too stressed out?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    • View all 4 answers
    • Betti A Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      There are numerous factors besides the ones you mention that come into play. Everyone's BC is different even with the same as yours so treatment(s) are individualized and tailored to each person. I'm guessing (no I'm not a doctor) but probably a combination of surgery of some sort, chemo.,...

      more

      There are numerous factors besides the ones you mention that come into play. Everyone's BC is different even with the same as yours so treatment(s) are individualized and tailored to each person. I'm guessing (no I'm not a doctor) but probably a combination of surgery of some sort, chemo., rads., & hormone blockers. You just need to get all the info. you can and make decisions you feel most comfortable with. Breast cancer is very treatable and not a death sentence. It's not easy but take a deep breath and try to relax some as stress doesn't help you at all.

      Comment
    • André Roberts Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 1 Patient

      These ladies are right. Everyone is different and so many things come into factor when deciding the best treatment for you. Right now it's such a whirlwind. Always have someone with you at appointments to help 'listen'. Be sure you make the dr explain so you understand everything they are saying....

      more

      These ladies are right. Everyone is different and so many things come into factor when deciding the best treatment for you. Right now it's such a whirlwind. Always have someone with you at appointments to help 'listen'. Be sure you make the dr explain so you understand everything they are saying. If you feel you need a second opinion, do so. Once you have a plan of action, you'll feel more relieved. Prayers to you.

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    How do I tell people I have breast cancer? Do I tell people I see regularly but who are just acquaintances?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    • Norma  Cook Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2014

      Who you tell is entirely up to you. Your health is a private matter and is no one else's business. That being said, you may want to share your diagnosis with people who will be a support and encouragement to you, as well as those who may need to temporarily assume any of your responsibilities...

      more

      Who you tell is entirely up to you. Your health is a private matter and is no one else's business. That being said, you may want to share your diagnosis with people who will be a support and encouragement to you, as well as those who may need to temporarily assume any of your responsibilities at work, home, church, etc. At first, I only told my immediate family and close friends who I knew I could count on to be there for me in whatever way I needed. As time went on and I had my surgery, then radiation, I told a few more people who were connected to my work, since I had to take some time off. I'm the type of person who tries to be sensitive to everyone's feelings and I didn't want to be a burden to anyone, but I was really blessed to have a couple of friends who had already walked the path I was taking and I could open up to them about my questions and concerns. Please feel free to ask any questions here--we aren't medical professionals but we are happy to share our own experiences with breast cancer if it will help someone else.

      Comment
    • André Roberts Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 1 Patient

      I agree with Norma. Totally up to you who you tell. As for how you tell them? It kinda depends on who your telling. Co-workers will be easiest. Family and close friends is harder as their first instinct is to look at you with sorrow, as if your going to die tomorrow. YOUR NOT! Most of us find...

      more

      I agree with Norma. Totally up to you who you tell. As for how you tell them? It kinda depends on who your telling. Co-workers will be easiest. Family and close friends is harder as their first instinct is to look at you with sorrow, as if your going to die tomorrow. YOUR NOT! Most of us find ourselves comforting others by reassuring them we are fine. Don't be afraid to tell the truth. You'll find the right words and the right time per individual. Prayers to you.

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    Following chemo ( TCH). I have developed allergy issues ( stuffy nose, drainage). It has been a year after chemo was complete. Anyone else have this issue? How did you handle it? Did it improve eventually?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    3 days 3 answers
    • André Roberts Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 1 Patient

      Herceptin causes dripping. It was horrible. I wanted to stick a tampon in my nostrils and cotton balls taped to my eyes. Lol! I can't remember how long it lasted after I had finished the Herceptin, but it did get better as time went on. Hang in there. Prayers to you.

      1 comment
    • Betti A Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      I had a regimen of TC and didn't experience those types of issues. Have you discussed it with your doctor as perhaps there is some cause other than the chemo.? I'm not a doctor, it's only a guess on my part. I did have "Taxotere tears" with the 3rd & 4th infusions and for a short time after...

      more

      I had a regimen of TC and didn't experience those types of issues. Have you discussed it with your doctor as perhaps there is some cause other than the chemo.? I'm not a doctor, it's only a guess on my part. I did have "Taxotere tears" with the 3rd & 4th infusions and for a short time after completing it but it was just my eyes, looked like I was always crying but my nose wasn't a problem.

      Comment
  • carrol carlisle Profile

    How long is the recovery time for a mastectomy

    Asked by anonymous

    stage_1 Patient
    3 days 3 answers
    • carrol carlisle Profile
      anonymous
      stage_1 Patient

      Thank you guys!

      Comment
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      No one can really answer that because we all heal differently. I've had a lumpectomy and a double mastectomy. My experiences were very different than others. Lumpectomy went well with no pain @ all. My double mastectomy was extremely painful because I had reconstruction @ the same time. Some...

      more

      No one can really answer that because we all heal differently. I've had a lumpectomy and a double mastectomy. My experiences were very different than others. Lumpectomy went well with no pain @ all. My double mastectomy was extremely painful because I had reconstruction @ the same time. Some women have said they experienced very little pain after mastectomy. I 🙏🏾 your surgery goes well

      Comment
  • carrol carlisle Profile

    How long after a mastectomy can you go back to work?

    Asked by anonymous

    stage_1 Patient
    3 days 2 answers
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      The standard recovery is 6 weeks before you are cleared for work but I was fine after 4 weeks. I was also back on my bike and kayaking. I was lucky to regain full motion in my arms fairly quickly after surgery. The rehab exercises were painful but I wanted to get out and enjoy life so I performed...

      more

      The standard recovery is 6 weeks before you are cleared for work but I was fine after 4 weeks. I was also back on my bike and kayaking. I was lucky to regain full motion in my arms fairly quickly after surgery. The rehab exercises were painful but I wanted to get out and enjoy life so I performed them diligently.

      Comment
    • Betti A Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      I imagine it depends on what type of work you do. I wasn't working at the time but was told to only bring my arm above my head slowly and no heavy lifting for it seems 4-6 weeks as I also had lymph nodes removed.

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    Can abnormal cells in cervical lead to breast cancer cause tonight I found 2 lumps in my breast & my breast has been sore for awhile I'm only 27

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    3 days 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • André Roberts Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 1 Patient

      I'm sure your lumps are swollen glands due to hormones. The more you touch them, they will hurt. You should do a self exam the same time every month in order to feel what's out of the ordinary if anything. With that said, "only 27" doesn't matter. Anyone at any age can get breast cancer. You...

      more

      I'm sure your lumps are swollen glands due to hormones. The more you touch them, they will hurt. You should do a self exam the same time every month in order to feel what's out of the ordinary if anything. With that said, "only 27" doesn't matter. Anyone at any age can get breast cancer. You should have those lumps checked out now. As I said, probably not cancer, but better to be safe then sorry. Prayers to you.

      Comment
    • Betti A Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      Any changes to one's body need to be checked by a doctor as some tests may be needed.

      Comment
  • carrol carlisle Profile

    Ok just found out I do have cancer in one breast. I have been given a choice of a mastectomy or lumpectomy with radiation. Has anyone else had to make the decision?

    Asked by anonymous

    stage_1 Patient
    3 days 8 answers
    • View all 8 answers
    • André Roberts Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 1 Patient

      What is your gut telling you to do? I wanted a bilateral but my doc said I didn't need to go so drastic, just a lumpectomy. That's what I did then. Turned out I didn't have clean margins - needed more surgery. Now he said I would be disfigured, so taking the breast would be best. After viewing my...

      more

      What is your gut telling you to do? I wanted a bilateral but my doc said I didn't need to go so drastic, just a lumpectomy. That's what I did then. Turned out I didn't have clean margins - needed more surgery. Now he said I would be disfigured, so taking the breast would be best. After viewing my pathology, turned out my cancer was very aggressive and 'invasive'. I then had a bilateral mastectomy with chemo. I didn't have a choice after all testing was done. So I'm saying there is a lot to take into consideration. It's not as easy as picking this or that. Do what's right for you. Take the time to decide or get another opinion if that's what you need. Prayers to you.

      Comment
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I made the decision in 2012 for lumpectomy. I couldn't get over loosing my breast & it seemed easier @ the time which it was. 2 yrs later cancer calcifications were found again in same breast & I had a double mastectomy with immediate reconstruction. Many women have had lumpectomies with no...

      more

      I made the decision in 2012 for lumpectomy. I couldn't get over loosing my breast & it seemed easier @ the time which it was. 2 yrs later cancer calcifications were found again in same breast & I had a double mastectomy with immediate reconstruction. Many women have had lumpectomies with no further issues. Only u can make that decision & yes it's hard one

      Comment
  • sherrie stump Profile

    I have lymphedema do to breast cancer. Can i go to tannning beds a couple times a week?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    • View all 5 answers
    • Betti A Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      They don't recommend tanning beds at all any more as they are totally unsafe, cancer or no cancer. I'd ask your doctor(s) and see what is said but I won't use one (never have).

      Comment
    • André Roberts Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 1 Patient

      I don't think lymphedema is effected by tanning. Prayers to you.

      Comment
  • Kathy  sveback  Profile

    tissue found inmy left axillary lymph node cancer?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    4 days 2 answers
    • André Roberts Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 1 Patient

      Not sure of your question. Does the lymph node contain cancer cells? You will know from your pathology report. If yes, you know they do, then your dr would have removed as many nodes in order to get to the 'clean' ones. Most likely contained and not spread elsewhere. Treatment will probably...

      more

      Not sure of your question. Does the lymph node contain cancer cells? You will know from your pathology report. If yes, you know they do, then your dr would have removed as many nodes in order to get to the 'clean' ones. Most likely contained and not spread elsewhere. Treatment will probably consist of chemo and radiation. Prayers to you.

      Comment
    • Betti A Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      I wasn't sure of your question either. I found what I thought was a lump in my axilla in June and I had had 8 nodes removed 3+ years ago that were all negative. I just happened to have an appt. with my Onc. nurse and mentioned it to her as she always does an exam. She told me, in my case it is...

      more

      I wasn't sure of your question either. I found what I thought was a lump in my axilla in June and I had had 8 nodes removed 3+ years ago that were all negative. I just happened to have an appt. with my Onc. nurse and mentioned it to her as she always does an exam. She told me, in my case it is just some excess fat (a major relief).

      Comment
Footer 1

An Early Detection Plan (EDP) significantly increases the chances of surviving breast cancer.

spread the word